Spider web

Spider web

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Jello molds with spider web

Jello molds with spider web

While I was in the Skagit Valley, I took a quick side trip to walk the flower fields at Jello Mold Farm.  It was a foggy morning, so instead of photographing in the morning light, I worked under white/gray skies.  But there was a surprising amount of color in the fields this time of year, especially in the dahlia beds.  Our warm weather has extended the growing season.  Here are a few photos from my fall visit:

Dahlia

Dahlia

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Monk's hood with spider web

Monk’s hood with spider web

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Tree Walk at Seward Park

September 8, 2014

Seward Park, Seattle

Seward Park, Seattle

“Today I have grown taller from walking with the trees.”
— Karle Wilson Baker, from 365 Days of Wonder: Mr. Browne’s Book of Precepts by R. J. Palacio

Earlier this summer when I walked the perimeter of Seattle, I passed by Seward Park without taking the time to explore it.  So I returned on Friday to see what this popular city park was all about and to walk the 2+ mile road edging the “peninsula” that juts into Lake Washington.  The city of Seattle has published a “Tree Walk at Seward Park,” and with this printout I set out to identify some of the magnificent trees in the park.  Let me take you along on my jaunt through Seward Park.

View of Mount Rainier across lake Washington from Seward Park

View of Mount Rainier across lake Washington from Seward Park

Row of Bolleana Poplars along the parking lot

Row of Bolleana Poplars along the parking lot

Leaves of the Bolleana Poplar

Leaves of the Bolleana Poplar

Garry Oak

Garry Oak

Leaves of Garry Oak

Leaves of Garry Oak

Spider web

Spider web

Madrona bark.  According to the city brochure, "Seward Park is home to Seattle's largest collection of Madrona trees.

Madrona bark. According to the city brochure, “Seward Park is home to Seattle’s largest collection of Madrona trees.

Another Madrona with peeling bark.  Madronas are native to the Pacific Northwest.

Another Madrona with peeling bark. Madronas are native to the Pacific Northwest.

Most of the trees in Seward Park are native Douglas Fir trees.

Most of the trees in Seward Park are native Douglas Fir trees.

The cones of the Douglas Fir have dragon-tongue-like protrusions jutting out from the cone bracts.

The cones of the Douglas Fir have dragon-tongue-like protrusions jutting out from the cone bracts.

Sketch of Douglas Fir cone

Sketch of Douglas Fir cone

Leaves and acrons from Northern Red Oak

Leaves and acorns from Northern Red Oak

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Threadleaf Falsecypress

Threadleaf Falsecypress

Traffic circle at Seward Park

Traffic circle at Seward Park

Blue Atlas Cedar

Blue Atlas Cedar

The clusters of the Blue Atlas Cedar look like spiky beads on a bracelet

The clusters of the Blue Atlas Cedar look like spiky beads on a bracelet

Coastal Redwoods

Coastal Redwoods

Leaf litter beneath the Coastal Redwoods

Leaf litter beneath the Coastal Redwoods

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Port Orford Cedar

Port Orford Cedar

Trail through the trees, Seward Park

Trail through the trees, Seward Park

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That Golden Time of Year

October 25, 2013

“Yellow the bracken,
Golden the sheaves . . .”
— Florence Hoatsen

Watercolor sketch of fall leaf

Watercolor sketch of fall leaf

Last week I celebrated the color red in the landscape.  Today’s post gives equal time to the yellows, golds, and greens.

Path at Green Lake

Path at Green Lake

Green Lake benches

Green Lake

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Spider web

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White birch with dappled leaves

White birch with dappled leaves

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Watercolor sketch of ginkgo leaf

Watercolor sketch of ginkgo leaf

Watercolor sketch of fall leaves

Watercolor sketch of fall leaves

 

 

 

“The web glistened in the light and made a pattern of loveliness and mystery, like a delicate veil.”
— E. B. White, Charlotte’s Web

Spider web in the morning light

It’s that time of year when the spiders are busily spinning huge webs.  There are several trees in my neighborhood that are swathed in gossamer veils.

Gossamer veils of webs decorate these trees

Another tree covered in webs

Patterns of loveliness and mystery

First Snow

November 23, 2010

Snow-frosted hydrangea

Spider web dusted with snow

Seattle got its first snow of the season yesterday.  I’ve heard predictions that this will be a snowy winter for us.  The forecasters might be right — this is early for snow to hit the city.  Some years we don’t get snow in Seattle all winter long.

I enjoyed my walk to work yesterday morning.  The snow was just beginning to stick, and I thought we’d be lucky to have an inch or two before it melted.  Some kids were already out sledding. 

The day grew increasingly blustery and cold.  By evening, two to six inches of accumulation were predicted, and temperatures dropped to the teens.  With the wind, it looked like a real blizzard outside.  The branch libraries closed two hours early at 6:00 p.m. to give staff extra time to get home on icy streets. 

Now it looks like the cold and ice will last until late Wednesday.  I’m glad we have no plans to travel this Thanksgiving.  I can relax and enjoy this first taste of winter.

Kids sledding at Green Lake on the first inches of snow

The last two sleds for sale at the hardware store in Greenwood

Maple leaf disappearing under the snow