Seward Park

Seward Park

Likened to a Begonia

September 10, 2014

Begonia

Begonia

“The begonia is, or then was, a plant of such senatorial qualities as to make a simile, in intention, most flattering.  Far from charming in its refinement, the begonia was remarkable for curious and showy foliage; it was conspicuous; it seemed to have no useful purpose; and it insisted on standing always in the most prominent positions.”
— Henry Adams, from The Education of Henry Adams

Begonias on the traffic circle at Seward Park

Begonias on the traffic circle at Seward Park

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Tree Walk at Seward Park

September 8, 2014

Seward Park, Seattle

Seward Park, Seattle

“Today I have grown taller from walking with the trees.”
— Karle Wilson Baker, from 365 Days of Wonder: Mr. Browne’s Book of Precepts by R. J. Palacio

Earlier this summer when I walked the perimeter of Seattle, I passed by Seward Park without taking the time to explore it.  So I returned on Friday to see what this popular city park was all about and to walk the 2+ mile road edging the “peninsula” that juts into Lake Washington.  The city of Seattle has published a “Tree Walk at Seward Park,” and with this printout I set out to identify some of the magnificent trees in the park.  Let me take you along on my jaunt through Seward Park.

View of Mount Rainier across lake Washington from Seward Park

View of Mount Rainier across lake Washington from Seward Park

Row of Bolleana Poplars along the parking lot

Row of Bolleana Poplars along the parking lot

Leaves of the Bolleana Poplar

Leaves of the Bolleana Poplar

Garry Oak

Garry Oak

Leaves of Garry Oak

Leaves of Garry Oak

Spider web

Spider web

Madrona bark.  According to the city brochure, "Seward Park is home to Seattle's largest collection of Madrona trees.

Madrona bark. According to the city brochure, “Seward Park is home to Seattle’s largest collection of Madrona trees.

Another Madrona with peeling bark.  Madronas are native to the Pacific Northwest.

Another Madrona with peeling bark. Madronas are native to the Pacific Northwest.

Most of the trees in Seward Park are native Douglas Fir trees.

Most of the trees in Seward Park are native Douglas Fir trees.

The cones of the Douglas Fir have dragon-tongue-like protrusions jutting out from the cone bracts.

The cones of the Douglas Fir have dragon-tongue-like protrusions jutting out from the cone bracts.

Sketch of Douglas Fir cone

Sketch of Douglas Fir cone

Leaves and acrons from Northern Red Oak

Leaves and acorns from Northern Red Oak

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Threadleaf Falsecypress

Threadleaf Falsecypress

Traffic circle at Seward Park

Traffic circle at Seward Park

Blue Atlas Cedar

Blue Atlas Cedar

The clusters of the Blue Atlas Cedar look like spiky beads on a bracelet

The clusters of the Blue Atlas Cedar look like spiky beads on a bracelet

Coastal Redwoods

Coastal Redwoods

Leaf litter beneath the Coastal Redwoods

Leaf litter beneath the Coastal Redwoods

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Port Orford Cedar

Port Orford Cedar

Trail through the trees, Seward Park

Trail through the trees, Seward Park

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