Wave by Richard Serra, Olympic Sculpture Park, Seattle

The Seattle Art Museum’s Olympic Sculpture Park is one of Seattle’s best bargain destinations.  Admission is free!  It’s located right on the waterfront overlooking Elliott Bay, so you can enjoy superb views while you view the art.

The Wave sculpture

The Wave by Richard Serra

Typewriter Eraser, Scale X by Claes Oldenberg and Coosje van Bruggen with Alexander Calder's red Eagle in the background

Detail of Typewriter Eraser

Flemish Lines by Nicholas Nyland

Flemish Lines

Seattle Cloud Cover by Teresita Fernandez, with Spaceneedle

Red chairs with ferry, Olympic Sculpture Park

Olympic Sculpture Park, Seattle

 

Fancy-Free Thursday

April 2, 2010

Yesterday was the first Thursday of the month, and my friend Carol and I took advantage of  free admission to the Seattle Art Museum and other offerings in downtown Seattle. 

Our bus got us downtown half an hour before the Art Museum opened, so we indulged in lattes at Fran’s Chocolates across the street.  We were treated to two complimentary chocolates.  What a great start to the day! 

Latte and complimentary chocolates at Fran's Chocolates

Carol and I had already seen the Calder Exhibit, but we enjoyed an encore visit.  We were again delighted by the paintings, sculptures, mobiles and jewelry.  We took a quick walk through some of the permanent exhibits as well.

Some/One sculpture by Do-Ho Suh, a robe constructed of 40,000 dog tags

 Carol and I then took a bus to Pioneer Square in the ride-free zone to enjoy free pizzas at Pizzeria Napoletana, which was celebrating its grand opening.  We waited in line for 30 minutes, and were treated to a free coffee from Cafe Vita while we waited.  The pizzas were delicious!

Crew assembles and cooks individual pizzas for a never-ending line of customers

My free pizza from Pizzeria Napoletana

 I then made my way by bus to the Seattle Asian Art Museum to see a new exhibit of Japanese woodblock prints.  Another exceptional exhibit and well worth a visit even for paying customers.

Woman Sewing while Man Watches by Eishosai Choki, the exterior sign for the current exhibit