Tree Walk at Seward Park

September 8, 2014

Seward Park, Seattle

Seward Park, Seattle

“Today I have grown taller from walking with the trees.”
— Karle Wilson Baker, from 365 Days of Wonder: Mr. Browne’s Book of Precepts by R. J. Palacio

Earlier this summer when I walked the perimeter of Seattle, I passed by Seward Park without taking the time to explore it.  So I returned on Friday to see what this popular city park was all about and to walk the 2+ mile road edging the “peninsula” that juts into Lake Washington.  The city of Seattle has published a “Tree Walk at Seward Park,” and with this printout I set out to identify some of the magnificent trees in the park.  Let me take you along on my jaunt through Seward Park.

View of Mount Rainier across lake Washington from Seward Park

View of Mount Rainier across lake Washington from Seward Park

Row of Bolleana Poplars along the parking lot

Row of Bolleana Poplars along the parking lot

Leaves of the Bolleana Poplar

Leaves of the Bolleana Poplar

Garry Oak

Garry Oak

Leaves of Garry Oak

Leaves of Garry Oak

Spider web

Spider web

Madrona bark.  According to the city brochure, "Seward Park is home to Seattle's largest collection of Madrona trees.

Madrona bark. According to the city brochure, “Seward Park is home to Seattle’s largest collection of Madrona trees.

Another Madrona with peeling bark.  Madronas are native to the Pacific Northwest.

Another Madrona with peeling bark. Madronas are native to the Pacific Northwest.

Most of the trees in Seward Park are native Douglas Fir trees.

Most of the trees in Seward Park are native Douglas Fir trees.

The cones of the Douglas Fir have dragon-tongue-like protrusions jutting out from the cone bracts.

The cones of the Douglas Fir have dragon-tongue-like protrusions jutting out from the cone bracts.

Sketch of Douglas Fir cone

Sketch of Douglas Fir cone

Leaves and acrons from Northern Red Oak

Leaves and acorns from Northern Red Oak

IMAGE_6547

Threadleaf Falsecypress

Threadleaf Falsecypress

Traffic circle at Seward Park

Traffic circle at Seward Park

Blue Atlas Cedar

Blue Atlas Cedar

The clusters of the Blue Atlas Cedar look like spiky beads on a bracelet

The clusters of the Blue Atlas Cedar look like spiky beads on a bracelet

Coastal Redwoods

Coastal Redwoods

Leaf litter beneath the Coastal Redwoods

Leaf litter beneath the Coastal Redwoods

IMAGE_6569

Port Orford Cedar

Port Orford Cedar

Trail through the trees, Seward Park

Trail through the trees, Seward Park

IMAGE_6570

 

10 Responses to “Tree Walk at Seward Park”


  1. Thank you for a day in Seward Park. It’s a great post to start my day and week. 🙂

  2. Judy Bishop Says:

    Dear Rosemary, I feel like I know you as we have a mutual friend in common, Bonnie Olpin, who introduced me to your blog. I too paint (WC and Acrylic) and just love the first photo od Tree Walk at Seward Park titled Seward Park, Seattle. I would like to ask if I may use the photo to paint a picture at some future date? I would give you credit for the photo of course. I love the colors and the gentle path leading back out of the picture.

  3. Kathleen Flannery Says:

    A very enjoyable vicarious walk. Thanks for taking it for me!

  4. shoreacres Says:

    What an assortment of trees you have. I was especially taken with the false cypress. The needles look just like what we call dry cypress, although I suppose yours and mine are different species.

    That last photo’s wonderful. My first thought was, “I didn’t know trees have belly buttons!”

  5. Robyn Says:

    Dearest Rosemary, I have been scourering your blog for several years now, absorbing every drop of Washington life I can. I am 10 days away from embarking on a 2 week road trip with my 10 year old son… I wish so badly to talk to you and find some of these places you have teased me with! Especially the Gordon Skagit Farms. Please email me at Robynt_s@Yahoo.com
    Thank you for all of your inspiration!
    Robyn (chirpandflutter)

  6. Margaret Says:

    You must be enjoying some fantastic weather in Seattle for such a clear view of Mount Rainier. I loved the shape of the Bolleana Poplar leaves – that was a new one for me.

  7. Leigh Says:

    I just found your blog and it’s wonderful! My family and I live just north of Seattle. Our little one is 5 years old now and I would love to find a local spot where she can experience the joy of “discovering” fallen acorns for herself. Do you have any recommendations for a great location and best time frame to go looking for them? Sincerest thanks! 🙂

    • Rosemary Says:

      Good luck finding fallen acorns. In my experience, the squirrels beat me to them every time! Last year I picked acorns before they hit the ground. There are oak trees on the boulevard by Ravenna and 65th. There are some, including a beautiful English oak, at the Arboretum. (They might also have suggestions for where to find oak trees in Seattle.) Have fun.


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