Discovering Kale

December 29, 2013

Curly kale

Curly kale

IMAGE_1051

Kale for breakfast, sauteed with a little onion and mushrooms -- a nest for a fried egg.

Kale for breakfast, sautéed with a little onion and mushrooms — a nest for a fried egg

Until this winter, I’ve never cooked with kale.  So discovering how much I like it feels like a new adventure in eating.  I am in the honeymoon stage, singing its praises like a new convert.  Have you been saved?

It turns out that kale is one of those superfoods you should be incorporating into your diet for healthy living.  An article in the May 2013 issue of the AARP Magazine touts its benefits:  “Rich in vitamin K, which is essential for blood clotting, kale also contains lutein, a nutrient that reduces the risk of cataracts and other eye disorders.  One serving of cooked kale has nearly triple the amount of lutein that a serving of raw spinach has.”

So good and good for you, too.

Watercolor sketch of kale leaf

Watercolor sketch of kale leaf

 

 

 

 

 

12 Responses to “Discovering Kale”

  1. Lorrie Says:

    My best Christmas present was discovering your blog on Friday. I forward to exploring your lovely photos, drawings and observations. My 59th birthday is today and I love kale!!

  2. Chris Says:

    Love Kale although I’ve never had it for breakfast before..that looks yummy with the egg! I love your sketch too…which just gave me an idea for you…A Cook’s Calendar, with sketchings of different food items, seasonal to each month! Perfect! 🙂

  3. napperscompanion Says:

    Hey, Rosemary. Your work is so gentle. Do you sell any of your watercolors? If you’ve mentioned elsewhere, please forgive. Peace, John

    • Rosemary Says:

      I haven’t gotten into the business side of things, and I’m not sure I will. I can’t quite figure out how people make any money in retail, selling cards and calendars and prints. Let’s say that with some luck I could even net $10 on a calendar or package of cards. I would have to sell 100 to make $1000. And think of the time I would need for bookkeeping, collecting sales tax and reporting it to the state, filing taxes, shipping things, and marketing. Another time sink hole. So my ambivalence about this makes me reluctant to try to sell my work right now. Thanks for asking.

  4. Elisa Says:

    I have trouble with Kale. It always tastes or feels in my mouth, like I’m eating little bits of sand or glass. Nothing I do seems to get past this issue. Collards are pretty easy for me to cook but doing the kale in the same manner doesn’t seem to fix the grit thingie. Maybe you know what I mean?!

    • Rosemary Says:

      I guess I’ve been fortunate that the kale from the gardens around here doesn’t taste gritty. Do you think it might relate too the sandiness of the soil?

      • Elisa Says:

        I have NO idea!! I wash and I wash :D. I have been able to use the kale in the processor with chickpeas dill cumin and mayo to make a spread. That’s pretty good. I just found some more kale recipes, I’ll keep trying to use it in simple things that are inexpensive, till I figure it out.

  5. shoreacres Says:

    I’ve never eaten kale in my life. I am prejudiced against kale. I’ve always believed it was tough and bitter. I don’t have a single reason to believe that except – I just do!

    Now you tell me I might have stalled my cataract development if I’d been eating the stuff. Well, better late than never, I suppose. That breakfast dish with the egg does look good. There’s my first new year’s resolution – to try Kale a la Rosemary for breakfast!

    • Rosemary Says:

      I, too, thought kale would be bitter. I sometimes stay stuck on the foods my mother prepared in my childhood. She never made kale or cauliflower or broccoli or Brussels sprouts. We ate beans and peas and carrots and corn and lettuce and spinach and endive and onions and potatoes. She canned and froze vegetables for the winter so seldom bought produce in the winter. Now I love what I think of as cold weather vegetables, fresh but seasonal winter fare.


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