Road Trip to Olympic National Park (Part 2): The Hoh Rain Forest

June 17, 2013

“the leaping greenly spirits of trees . . .”
— e e cummings

Tall trees of the Hoh Rain Forest

Tall trees of the Hoh Rain Forest

Our second Olympic National Park destination was the Hoh Rain Forest.  This temperate rain forest gets 12 to 14 feet of rain each year, but we were lucky to be visiting on a sunny day.  We began seeing moss-draped trees on the road leading into the heart of the rain forest.  Instead of fifty shades of gray, we were seeing fifty shades of green.

Fisherman in the Hoh River

Fisherman in the Hoh River

The road into the Hoh valley

The road into the Hoh valley

Green, green stream

Green, green stream

Hall of Mosses trail

Hall of Mosses trail

Tall trees on a rare blue-sky day

Tall trees on a rare blue-sky day

Living giants

Living giants

New growth on fallen log

New growth on fallen log

Light through a lacey green curtain

Light through a lacey green curtain

 

Nurse log (fallen tree nourishing new trees)

Nurse log (fallen tree nourishing new trees)

Rings of a fallen giant

Rings of a fallen giant

Ground cover

Ground cover

Noah peeking around the trunk of a giant

Noah peeking around the trunk of a giant

These ferns reminded me of sea horses

These ferns reminded me of sea horses

Ferns with Holga-ish effect

Ferns with Holga-ish effect

190-foot fallen Sitka spruce

190-foot fallen Sitka spruce

Moss-Hung Trees
by Gertrude Gilmore, 1936

Moss-hung trees
Like the mantilla of a beautiful lady’s ghost
Bearing elusive fragrance of a faint perfume
Soft, caressing;
Shaped
Like the wings of huge, inert gray moths, —
Weird and uncertain branches veining them
Gossamer, intangible;
And reshaped
Like fairy cobwebs interlacing mesh upon mesh
With lights of foolish insects caught within them
Restive, darting
With shadows —
Like half reluctant thoughts lately modified
In a world of fantastical shapes and causes,
Mystical, fleeting.

Mossy branches of a maple tree

Mossy branches of a maple tree

Moss-laden maple

Moss-laden maple

6 Responses to “Road Trip to Olympic National Park (Part 2): The Hoh Rain Forest”

  1. Elisa Says:

    OH myyyyyyyy, the angel/fairy in the tree!

  2. anthonyvenable110 Says:

    Reblogged this on anthonyvenable110.

  3. shoreacres Says:

    Well, lookie here. That fallen Sitka spruce is the very sort that contributed wood for the mast for the boat I’ve sailed most. You can see the mast in this set of photos. Gosh, I did love that boat.

    The Hoh rain forest gets about the same amount of rain as the Liberian rain forest (which gets roughly 140″ a year). The big difference is that Liberia is divided into a wet season and a dry season, so there aren’t the mosses, etc. that you show here. By the time our dry season was over, everything was covered with laterite dust. In fact, one of the most well-known books about Liberia is titled “Red Dust on the Green Leaves”.

    • Rosemary Says:

      Lovely boat. I bet there are lots of lessons boat dwellers could shard with those of us on land. Have you ever written about that?


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