When, Exactly, Did Winter Arrive?

December 21, 2012

“It was hard to say when exactly winter arrived.  The decline was gradual, like that of a person into old age, inconspicuous from day to day until the season became an established, relentless reality.”
— Alain de Botton, The Art of Travel

Frost-lined leaves

Frost-lined leaves

“The winters come now as fast as snowflakes.”
— Henry David Thoreau, Journals, December 7, 1856

Today is the Winter Solstice, and I, for one, am thrilled that we have reached our darkest day and that daylight will begin to creep back slowly, lengthening our days.  I will try to foster a more romantic attitude to accompany this cold and dreary time:

“I see the winter approaching without much concern, though a passionate lover of fine weather, and the pleasant scenes of summer, but the long evenings have their comforts too, and there is hardly to be found upon earth, I suppose, so snug a creature as an Englishman by the fireside in the winter.”
— William Cowper

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5 Responses to “When, Exactly, Did Winter Arrive?”


  1. Happy Solstice Rosemary and Happiest Holidays!

  2. Adrienne Says:

    After a mild, dry autumn, my Wisconsin winter is now in order with cold, wind and snow. Morning sun on the snow brightens my Christmas decorated house. I send holiday wishes across the miles, Rosemary.

  3. shoreacres Says:

    Here we are at the Solstice, and I was forced to put on long pants and a jacket, compliments of a “real” cold front – my goodness, it got down to 38!

    I enjoyed de Botton’s description of winter’s approach. That’s rather the way it’s been with my gray hair. Now and then I run into a mirror and a fluorescent light at the same time and it’s quite startling!

  4. garden.poet Says:

    Such a perfect holiday photo- the green frosted in white, highlighted by red.


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